Group Coaching Model That Is Super Simple To Implement

A group coaching program can be really difficult to implement, or really easy to implement. Some of the common things I hear when I recommend a client start a group coaching are:

1) I don't have time to talk with dozens of clients each week

2) I don't have time to spend 5-10 hours a week writing lesson plans

3) I can't be available 24-7 on email

4) It just takes too much time.

5) It's a lot of work technically to do it.

And the thing is, those are all valid – because in so many of the older models, that's how it might have worked.

In fact, maybe as you read that list, you are thinking, yeah, that's me – I want to start a coaching program, but it just seems like too much work.

So let me ask you this:

What if I were to show you a way you could coach 100 – 1000 clients in just 2 hours a week, and they get almost the same results as working with you 1-1?

If that would be cool, if that would feel like, "yeah, I could do that," then read on!

Because I'm going to show you a super-simple coaching model that really works.

Before I get into it, I want to go over one concept: and that is the idea that group coaching does not get the same results as 1-1 coaching.

The thing is, the coaching itself isn't what gets results.

Your clients' ACTION and implementation gets them results.

The biggest reason that 1-1 coaching generally gets better results than group coaching is because with 1-1 coaching, the client feels obligated to finish his work before your next scheduled call.

How many times has your client told you, "yesterday I remembered I hadn't finished the assignment you gave me, and I thought about cancelling today's session, but decided to work a late night to complete the work instead," or something similar?

The thing is, if that client had been in group coaching, he probably wouldn't have done the work.

But is it really the group coaching or the clients' motivation that gets the work done?

Your client needs to step up and do the work on his own. You are a coach, not a babysitter. You are a coach, not a high school teacher. It is your clients responsibility to do the work. He needs to learn how to manage his time, and learn to focus. You can teach him those things, but he has to do it.

You are a coach, not a personal assistant, personal planner, or daytimer.

Now, here's the thing, if you are willing to limit yourself to helping only 20 clients at a time, when you have inside of you the ability to change possibly millions of lives (I mean, how many people NEED what you help with?) , then you shouldn't probably do group coaching.

But what if you knew there were 1000 people RIGHT NOW in your …