Trademark International Class – Class 25 (Clothing)

All goods or services are categorized within International Classes (IC hereafter). Goods run from classes IC 1-34, while Services are in IC 35-45. Let's take a closer look at one of these trademark classes – class 25.

What is International Class 25 All About?

Each class has a short title heading that gives a snapshot of what that class is all about – IC 25's short title is clothing. But, as with anything trademark, there's more to it than that. The USPTO has 887 accepted descriptions that fit into IC 25.

IC 25 is pretty straightforward in that clothing of virtually any type you can think of is going to be here. The exceptions are clothing that's of a protective nature (eg bulletproof vests, clothing worn by motorcyclists for protection against injury), which, oddly enough, is in IC 9.

How do I File in IC 25?

Filing in IC 25 is a bit different from other goods classes in terms of the required specimen . When it comes to clothing, the best thing to send to the USPTO is either a tag or a label. This makes it clear that the name and / or logo is being used for a clothing line. Your specimen can be a tag that's attached to the garment, such as a hang tag, or it can be a tag that's sewn into the garment.

The USPTO will no longer accept a picture of, for instance, a t-shirt with the name appearing only on the front. Those days are over. The USPTO considers this ornamental as it's "conveying a message rather than indicating the source of the goods."

What Else is in International Class 25?

Seems like with any of these trademark classes, there always seems to be the oddball item or two and IC 25 is no exception. Here are a few items living in IC 25 that seem a bit off:

o gift packages sold as a unit consisting of a sweatshirt and also including a photo frame, a coffee mug, and a tote bag
o race number belts that hold a paper number on the race participant's front or back during competition
o undergarment accessories, namely, removable silicone buttock enhancer pads

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How to Teach a Women's Self-Defense Class

In teaching self-defense to women it is important to stress at the outset that the tips we will be covering are suggestions. They are not iron clad, as every situation is going to be different, and women must assess for themselves whether they have a fighting chance.

It is also important to stress the fact that if a woman did not follow any of the steps you will be teaching, they did not necessarily do anything 'wrong'. (There may be women in your class that have been assaulted in the past, and you don't want to sound like you are attacking their behavior).

To be clear, it is indeed a sad state of affairs that we even need to address this topic. No woman deserves to live in fear for her safety. The sad truth is, there are a lot of sick individuals in this world, and they prey upon the meek.

That said, here are some tips that women can employ to make them less likely to be a victim of an assault.

1. Conduct business during the daytime, and avoid unlit areas at night.

Women are far more likely to be attacked at night in areas that an assailant can easily hide himself or herself. Always park near your destination, and in well-lit areas.

2. Travel in groups.

2 women are far less likely to be attacked than a single person. The more the merrier, and the likelihood of being attacked drops dramatically

3. Always tell somebody where you are going, and when they should expect you to arrive.

Time is of the essence if you are abducted or injured due to an attack.

4. Carry your keys in your hand.

This will allow you to get into your car more quickly, and they can be used as a weapon if necessary. Carry them between your fingers to strike with if necessary.

5. If confronted, make eye contact, and study the description of your assailant.

This is vital in finding the bad guy, and will help prevent him from doing it again. There is a fine line here. Let them know you see them, and are aware fo their presence, but some guys will take too much eye contact as an invitation.

6. Make as much noise as possible if you are attacked.

You never know who might be near by that can help you, and most attackers will flee if they think they may be caught.

7. Never let somebody relocate you.

Allowing somebody to take you where they know they will not be disturbed will never end well for you.

8. Be aware of your surroundings. Make a mental note of avenues of escape.

Make a game of it. I always do this wherever I go.

9. Carry yourself with confidence. Don't look like a victim.

Typically, assailants look for those who will go easily and not put up a fight.

10. Don't wear expensive jewelry or flaunt cash in public.

Particularly on vacation, people are …