How to Sell Digital Books at Physical Events

Digital books are a great way to get your content quickly into the hands of millions of readers. But what about selling digital books at physical events? You can tell people about your book and how great it is, but they can’t actually buy the book unless you have a kiosk set up for it or a mobile card reader to make them buy then and there. If you want a better approach to selling your digital books at physical events, then you’ll be happy to know that there is something you can do to improve your marketing.

The Sell

What are you selling? Digital books, of course. However, that’s information in a digital space and people can’t touch it (unlike physical books). So, how do you sell a digital product at a physical event that people can actually touch? It comes down to coupon codes. Some companies, such as Enthrill, are selling coupon codes at cheap prices that you can use however you want.

Here’s how it works. First, you buy the coupon codes. The prices are currently set $1.50 per code with a minimum purchase of 100 coupons. You can then upload your book to their servers and whoever inputs the code will get your book. You can also do this by making your own coupon codes and uploading books to your own website or server, which will cut down the price, but this approach requires some technical knowledge and a website under your complete control (so no free websites).

Regardless, you’ll see that even paying the $1.50 per coupon code can still yield some lucrative results.

Making a Product

Now that you have the coupon codes, what do you do with them? Do you write them down on notebook paper and hand them out? Do you write them on business cards? The best thing you can do is print them on small items that you can sell. This allows you to make your product more valuable while improving your selling ability.

For example, let’s say that you have a cookbook. You can sell a small bag of ingredients and place a tag on the bag with the coupon code. Or, you could sell spatulas, spoons or other kitchen tools and print the coupon code on them. Or, let’s say that your book is about weight loss. You can print the coupon code on pedometers, portion control plates, resistance bands or various other items. Just sell the item for $10 and you have a nice profit and a new reader. Even with the extra promotional item, you should be able to double your investment.

Simpler Approach

If getting a promotional item and printing codes on it is too hard, then don’t worry. There’s a much simpler approach that, while not as effective, can still make you a lot of money. Enthrill is willing to print the codes out on gift cards so that you can hand them out during your event. If you would prefer printing the codes …

A Comparison Of Online Loose Diamond Shopping Compared To Physical Retail Stores

When shopping for diamonds, many today are still undecided about if it's best to buy their diamond online or physically in a retail store. I have decided to make this comparison to help determine if shopping online is best for you or not. There are several factors that influence if it's the best choice or not, with some advantages and disadvantages for each. In this post, I will explain as best as I can the benefits and downsides of the two.

Certification

Most online retailers only sell certified diamonds, either by the GIA, HRD or IGI. In many physical retail stores, a majority of the diamonds will not be certified. This is normal, as jewelers themselves are almost always certified graders, but it does not inspire confidence for some consumers. In all cases of a trusted jeweler, there should be no doubt about the quality of the diamond. However, certification costs money, and an advantage of buying certified diamonds vs non-certified diamonds is that you will often find them at a cheaper price. However, in general it is highly recommended to buy certified diamonds, because although all jewelers may be able to tell the clarity and color of a diamond, some may not as easily distinguish bad cuts of grades of fluorescence.

Selection

You will have to visit many shops before you encounter the large selection you will find inside the average experienced online diamond vendor's store. The average jeweler usually only carries a fraction of the diamonds in a physical location in comparison. I would estimate the average jewelry shop would have around a handful of dozen (usually less) loose diamonds of noteworthy size (noteworthy, I use a relatively strict definition of about 0.50 carats). The selection of less than a hundred compared to the thousands you would find online is where the online selection shows the largest advantage. The larger selection allows for the potential buyers to have a much easier time finding exactly the diamond that they might want, whereas if the client is inclined to buy in a retail store, the situation will often end with the buyer settling for a diamond slightly different than he might have wanted.

In the case of all online vendors, they are connected with a direct line to the cutters, which buy directly from the miners. There are no unneeded middle men this way. Most jewelers depend on people buying from the cutters and selling them onwards, which is why they don't have direct access to such large lists, which only increases prices, but more on that later.

However, a downside of this large selection is that the average online retailer needs about two weeks to deliver, while when visiting the store you can pay on the spot and leave with the item instantly. For the person who does not wish to wait, this might be a big factor. A lot of people don't have the patience to wait so long for what they purchased, which I find very understandable. …