Use Your Individual Learning Style to Develop Your Texas Holdem Poker Skills

Whether you are just learning how to play Texas Holdem Poker or are an experienced veteran at the poker tables, learning and / or improving your poker skills is an ongoing process. This learning process will be easier and more effective if you know and understand your individual learning style. Your Individual learning style involves the natural process by which you most easily acquire and then remember new information and knowledge. Educational research has identified three basic Learning Styles. They are Auditory, Visual and Tactile sometimes called Kinesthetic.

The name of each Learning Style pretty well defines the Learning Style. The Auditory Learning Style relates to hearing and Listening. The Visual Learning Style involves the eyes through seeing and viewing. The Tactile, or Kinesthetic, Learning Style involves touching and feeling. As you can see each of these Learning Styles involves at least one of the five senses Hearing, Seeing, Touching, Smelling and Tasting. Early learning in infants is totally sensory as the baby is bombarded by sensual stimuli. The baby's sensory receptors gather this sensory date in huge amounts developing a complex system of neuron pathways that carry information to the brain. Initially Taste and Smell play a very significant role in the baby's learning. Baby's first learning occurs through hearing, smelling and seeing as it forms its bond with its mother. Taste lets baby make its first real choices by accepting or rejecting food. Taste and Smell continue to play an important role in learning throughout lifelong learning primarily through pleasure and avoidance. Pleasant smelling and tasting items are to be sought after while foul-smelling or tasting items are to be avoided. Seeing, Hearing and Touching are the basis for acquiring the majority of the higher level learning that occurs throughout childhood, adolescence and adulthood. Individuals develop a sensory preference for acquiring and remembering new information which then determines their individual Learning Style.

Auditory Learners learn best by hearing and listening. They understand and remember things that they have heard. Visual Learners learn by reading and viewing images. They understand and remember things by sight. The Tactile Learner learns and remembers best when their learning process involves touching and doing, where physical activity is part of the learning process. These Learning Styles come into play in any situation where new knowledge or skills are being introduced.

For the beginning poker player the learning curve is much greater than for the experienced poker player. The beginning poker player is being introduced to a new vocabulary, new processes and new problem solving skills. The experienced player is building upon already acquired knowledge and skills. Both of these groups of poker players have the best chance of assimilating their new knowledge if they use the learning processes that best suits their natural systems for acquiring and retaining knowledge. As each individual accumulates new knowledge and new skills they develop a sensory preference for gathering and retaining this sensory data. That preference is their individual Learning Style.

In part 2 of this article, …

MARS Model of Individual Behavior and Results

Companies are striving to answer many questions in efforts to benefit from positive employee behavior in the workplace. The goal of most companies is to foster a win-win situation for both the company and associate. What is the difference between a happy satisfied employee and a disgruntled unmotivated employee? Is it how much money he or she makes, or the amount of time they spend on the job? Is it the work environment? Does the position meet the needs of the employee? Can the employee successfully perform? Does the employee know the role they play in their organization? Has the manager provided their employees with the required tools to be successful? In fact, there is a model of individual behavior that answers these questions quite well. The MARS model of Individual Behavior and Results introduced in chapter two of Organizational Behavior, 4th edition (McShane & Von Glinow) is an excellent medium for creating the win-win relationship between the employer and associate.

This model identifies four interrelated elements that have an affect on employee performance; Motivation, Ability, Role perception and Situational factors. These factors are highly interrelated; for example, a data analyst is skilled in running reports (ability), self taught on how to use the latest tools to extrapolate data (motivation), and understands how this information will help management make decisions (role perception), but does not have the required access to the data files (situational factors). Unless all of the elements of the MARS model are satisfied, employee behavior and performance will be negatively impacted.

A successful manager will possess a clear understanding of the abovementioned elements and be able to apply them. Motivation is the internal influence affecting employees’ actions. Employers must meet the intrinsic needs of associates to fully capitalize on the motivation element of this model. In order to accomplish the job, employees must have the necessary abilities. Managers are responsible for ensuring their employees receive the required training and skills to be successful. Another critical function of the ability element is to place employees in positions that will effectively utilize their talents. The third element of the MARS model is role-perception. Staff members must have a clear understanding of where they fit in the organization and how they contribute to the overall mission. Comprehensive job descriptions with clear expectations will aid the associate in understanding the role-perception element. The final element is Situational factors. Employees must have all of the required tools, equipment and work space to accomplish the job.

How does a manager adopt the MARS model? Starting with motivation, employers must have a good relationship with employees and discover the driving force behind their actions. One well known theory of motivation organizations must consider is Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. In the workplace Maslow’s hierarchy levels are satisfied as follows:

Level 1 – Physiological & Body – Good salary and safe working conditions.

Level 2 – Safety and Security – Job training programs and enrichment.

Level 3 – Social & Friends – Team building seminars and …