Critical Acclaim for Patrick Rothfuss and His Unique Style of Writing

Patrick Rothfuss is one of the most interesting and unique writers of this generation. You won’t find Twilight love stories here. His unique writing style paired with his special sense of humor has given rise to some of the most mind capturing pieces of work of this decade. His work has been critically acclaimed for his unique sense of writing style and captivating story lines. It won’t be long before he makes millions of dollars selling the book rights over for a major motion picture trilogy for his bestselling books. Patrick Rothfuss is a bestselling American writer who capitalizes on creating fantasy works and is also a guest lecturer at some of the major universities around the United States.

Patrick Rothfuss was born on June 6th, 1973 in Madison, Wisconsin. He was active at his school newspaper The Pointer at the University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point. He is a naturally gifted fantasy writer which is demonstrated in all of his literary works of art. He currently works at his Alma Mata. He wrote the critically acclaimed The Kingkiller Chronicle which expanded into a three-volume series. But just because he is a best seller, it doesn’t mean that this is the first honorable nod that he has received in the literary world.

In fact, in 2002 Patrick Rothfuss won the prestigious Writers of the Future award in 2002 for his work The Road to Levinshir. He eventually sold this novel to DAW Books. His career exploded with the release of The Name of the Wind, the first part of his three-part series of the KingKiller Chronicle. In 2007, he won the Quail Award and the “Best Books of the Year” award from Publishers Weekly from their Science Fiction/ Fantasy/ Horror division. He also became a #1 New York Times Best Seller for his trilogy. The second book released in the trilogy is The Wise Man’s Fear which was released in March of 2011. The last book in the trilogy is titled The Doors of Stone. The release date has yet to be revealed for all of the Patrick Rothfuss fans out there.

Other works that Rothfuss has published and been critically acclaimed for his unique style of writing include “The Adventures of the Princess and Mr. Whiffle” published in July of 2010 and Subterranean: Tales of Dark Fantasy where he published his award-winning The Road to Levinshir. There is no doubt that Patrick Rothfuss is a leading writer in the fantasy genre. He has brought a unique style of writing that most authors could only wish of possessing. He is an enormously talented fantasy writer, one who has yet to be fully recognized for all of his powerful and inspiring work within the genre. He is certainly a writing superstar with much more critically acclaimed work to come.

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3 Critical Logic Model Mistakes and How To Avoid Them

Are You Making These 3 Critical Logic Model Mistakes In Your Program Evaluation?

A logic model is a great way to create a visual representation of your program. At the core of a logic model, each visual representation, or infographic, illustrates a sequence of cause and effect relationships.

Are you making these 3 critical mistakes in your program evaluation?

It is so easy to make these mistakes. We recognize that managing a program is hard work. It takes a lot of time to make sure that services are being delivered, staffing is secured, and participants are engaged, not to mention all the other things that pop up here and there.

You are very busy, so making these mistakes is not unheard of – actually its pretty common. So here we provide you with information on some of the most common mistakes made when creating a model and how to avoid them. These simple actions will take the ambivalence you might have and replace it with confidence!

Mistake # 1: Making Your Model Too Complicated

At its core, a logic model is intended to communicate with others about your theory or basic assumption about your program. When logic models are too detailed, or complicated, the information is not easy to understand or use.

A great way to easily identify your main point is to answer this question: "Why is this a good solution for the identified problem?"

Logic models come in all shapes and sizes but at the end of the day – it must clearly show "what causes what," "in what order," and "what the desired result is."

What to do Instead:

Don't make your model too complicated. Here are some guidelines for creating a basic logic model for your program and a checklist that will help guide you.

_____ Have you identified the cause and effect connections in an intentional order?

_____ Do you effectively and efficiently convey the purpose of your program?

_____Are you showing what the desired results of your program are?

If you have each of these elements then you have a basic logic model that will successfully engage the supporters of your program. Remember, you are not developing an action plan, that is different. Action plans are more detailed and provide step by step guidelines for program implementation.

Mistake # 2: Leaving the Logic Model, "On The Shelf!"

When was the last time you touched your logic model? Do you believe that logic models, once created, do not change? This is one of the greatest misconceptions and mistakes that logic modelers and program managers make. The belief that logic models are static prevents the successful use of the model as a tool in your program.

New information becomes available every day. Obviously, an every day review would be tedious and an inefficient use of your time and effort. Reviewing your model too often also can prevent you from getting your program up and running or sustained. However, a periodic review – a minimum of once …