Shopping Carts and ATVs Do Not Mix

ATV Safety is paramount considering the high-performance machines on the market today. To illustrate this point let me tell you of a story that I witnessed recently. I was RV'ing and had stopped at a Wal-Mart near a huge open space, nothing around really and there was about 100-miles of open space in one direction. You could literally ride your ATV until you ran out of gas I guess. Well apparently there is an area not to far from that local Wal-Mart where all the ATVs like to meet.

It is indeed a good location where no one would complain about the dust or the noise and so everyone is looking to have a good time. Well all except one person who had to be airlifted out of there and I cannot imagine where to, as I do not know of a reasonable sized city with a hospital for a good 300 miles. Nevertheless, let me continue this story.

It appears someone bought groceries at the Wal-Mart and took the shopping cart off campus into the hard dirt area where some of the RVs with ATV Trailers were. The RVs then left and there was a jump area up to the plateau that the ATVs were riding up and catching some serious air.

Well one ATV jumped up and then while coming down hooked the front tire in the shopping cart and proceeded to cartwheel to his demise. Compound fractures, blood and everything and it was a mess indeed. I was reloading my digital camera with a memory stick and missed the shot, too bad. But alas there is a moral to this story; ATVs and Shopping Carts do not mix.

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Collect Shopping Carts Safely and Efficiently – How to Keep Your Parking Lot Clean

Scattered shopping carts create quite the inconvenience for not only store owners but for customers as well. When carts are not put away in the proper location they are not available for customer use and are often scattered in the parking lot requiring store personnel to run around and collect them. Lost carts found throughout the city are a public nuisance that ordinances are being put into effect requiring stores to manage their shopping carts or they will be fined. Each collection solution has advantages and disadvantages which are detailed further below.

There are a number of effective ways stores can retrieve their carts. Stores can use equipment called a cart pusher, puller, retriever, or cart manager. Stores can also hire additional personnel to physically retrieve the shopping carts scattered throughout the parking lot. Award systems are also used to provide customers with incentives to bring them back to the appropriate destination once they are done using them. Corrals and search teams can also be used to help control wandering carts. Lastly, a pull rope can help employees retrieve shopping carts more efficiently than collecting them individually or just a few at a time.

A motorized cart pusher, also known as a puller, retriever, or cart manager makes retrieving shopping carts safe, fast and easy! Here is how one type of retriever available works: first you place the cart's back wheels effortlessly into the cart-cradle nesting cups. Some systems require bolting the cart onto the pusher but the nesting cup option protects the grocery-cart from damage that can occur when bolted on as well as gives you availability to use all of your fleet at any time. Next, the rest of the fleet is collected and nested onto the first one that is sitting in the cart-cradle nesting cups. A safety strap is placed over the entire row and attached to the first which is in the nesting cups so they all can be pushed safely to their destination. Some of these pushers utilize a remote control to push the row in the designated direction. Many motorized retrievers are built with a strobe light and brake light to provide greater visibility to those surrounding cars and pedestrians. These retrievers can retrieve a high volume of carts and only one person is needed to operate one. Motorized pushers can retrieve 3 to 4 times more shopping carts than a single person can, thus reducing the store's labor costs. Retrievers also reduce liabilities from injury as employees can effortlessly retrieve the carts with the use of this type of equipment. No straining comes from pushing or pulling an entire row. The upfront cost to purchase a machine is quickly recouped from the reduced labor and liability costs.

Another method to collect shopping carts is to hire additional personnel to go around the parking lot to retrieve the shopping carts by hand and bring them back to the appropriate location so that they may be available for customer use. This method does however, …

How to Make Money Fast by Retrieving and Returning Shopping Carts

Are you looking for a way to make money fast? If you have a large utility vehicle, like a pick-up truck, you can retrieve and return shopping carts for a cash reward.

Most every mid to large retail grocery, variety and department store has a stock of shopping carts on hand. They are purchased by the store, of course, so that customers can use them when shopping in their store.

Shopping buggies are expensive. The average cost to the retailer for just one is between 75 and 100 dollars. Large ones like the kind you find at wholesale and club stores can run upwards of 200 dollars or more.

Most retail stores have dozens of them; busy big-box stores may even have hundreds of them. Purchasing enough of them to meet a store's demand and traffic levels requires a significant expenditure of cash.

It is, therefore, in the best interest of the retailer to protect that investment. Most retailers do their best to make sure that carts remain on store property. However, shopping buggy theft is all too common. The average store loses about $ 8,000 $ 10,000 to per year to this problem.

Because they are so expensive to buy, many store owners and retail companies pay cash rewards for the return of their carts which have been stolen (or "borrowed") and not returned. Cash rewards typically range from 25 to 50 dollars per cart.

Here's how you can retrieve and return those buggies for cash: contact retailers in your area which have shopping carts. Find out if they pay for returned carts. Many do, but won't give cash rewards to just anyone. (Store owners don't want the public to abuse the reward system by stealing carts themselves in order to get the reward.) Usually you have to sign a cash-for-retrieval contract.

You'll have to provide some forms of identification, usually a driver's license plus one other item (like a Social Security or credit card). You may have to sign a waiver absolving the store of liability in the event of something unforeseen.

You can make arrangements with any or all of the retailers in your area. The more contracts you have, the more money you can make.

If you've lived in your city for any length of time, you've probably seen common dump sites for stolen shopping buggies. Visit these areas regularly. Additionally, get in the habit of keeping your eyes open every time you're out and about town. You'll probably spot discarded shopping carts regularly. You can pick these up and return them as you come across them, or store them at home until you have several of them.

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