Women Movements That Inspired The Women Empowerment In America During The 19th Century

Ever since the beginning to the first half of the 1800's, women had been ready to move out of their conventional families for making an impactful impression, globally. This was mainly in consideration to finding the opportunities for marking women rights equally weighted in the society.

Such women were not just courageous but equally defined the most respectable positions in the society because of the cause they stood up for. Fighting for the women's rights, there were numerous women's organisms that were shaped for this long lasting hard battle for women's equality and rights.

Female Seminary Movement

One of the foremost movements in this regard was this seminary movement that commenced and took a serious shape by 1815, led by eminent leaders such as- Emma Willard, Catherine E. Beecher, Zilpah P. Grant, Mary Lyon and Joseph Emerson. The intention of this movement was to improve the level of women's education for transforming women as better citizens of US and be called as the "mothers of future statesmen." This movement did not directly contributed to women's rights movement but had a significant foundation building part of the game which was a small yet significant drive for equality of women.

Seneca Falls Convention -July 19th and 20th 1848, in Seneca Falls New York

The Seneca Falls Convention emerged as a pretty much influential women's rights convention. This was the first ever meeting organized by women in public at the United States. The main aim of this convention was to encourage higher number of people towards the subject of women's rights. In addition, the Declaration of Right and Sentiments took a step forward for the signature drive at this convention.

Women had very minimal rights during the early phase of 1800's. They weren't allowed to vote nor have an ownership of a property. Susan Anthony who was born in Massachusetts during the 1820 and later moved to New York at six and attended Deborah Moulson's Female Seminary-a Quaker boarding school located in Philadelphia at seventeen, was the active building stone for this movement.

Such significant leaders with their imperative knowledge and wisdom have been fighting for the women rights and equality which further took the movement for earning equal rights for women and their empowerment as well. The women have gained top notch positions in the society as they decided to stood up for themselves and fight for their rights, equality and status.

Source Article

Exploring the Jewelry of Colonial America

With Thanksgiving a few weeks away, we thought it was a good time to go back in time and explore the jewelry styles that were popular with our founding fathers and mothers. Although the pilgrims were stark and austere, by the 18th century colonial America had become adorned. So pull up a wooden chair, sit down with a cup of hot tea and enjoy some tales of jewelry in early America.

Recorded History Begins with the Newspaper

How do we know what our early American ancestors wore? Portraits of well-to-do citizens and their families that have survived the ages are one source. But we get much of our historical information from colonial newspapers. In 1704, the British government allowed the publication of The Boston News-Letter, which became the first continually published newspaper in America.

Like today’s papers, colonial papers carried many advertisements related to jewelry, from sales ads by goldsmiths and silversmiths to lost and found and stolen property ads by citizens. The papers that survived from that time provide an interesting and accurate account of what Americans bought, wore, lost and stole. Gold and silver jewelry, precious and semiprecious stones, diamonds, rubies, emeralds, topaz, garnets were highly prized by the colonists – and for the same reasons today: an appreciation of its beauty, the collection of wealth and the appearance of status and social standing in the community.

What They Bought, Wore and Stole

Based on sales, lost and found and stolen property ads from various colonial newspapers, the jewelry that was popular includes silver snuff and tobacco boxes with mother of pearl lids, gold and silver sleeve buttons, brooches with detailed portraits set with gemstones, elaborate silver hilted swords, garnet and crystal three-drop earrings, coral necklaces, silver and gold watches, gold heart lockets set with garnets, and, of course, gold and silver belt buckles. An ornate belt buckle was an essential fashion piece to complete a well-dressed look.

A Blending of Cultures

Colonial jewelry came from various sources, and the result was a melting pot of the cultures convening in the colonies. The Native American Indian tribes were known for their intricate beadwork. They would stitch together thousands of beads made of carved bone and wood, ground coral, shell, turquoise and copper.

Spanish silversmiths and goldsmiths helped introduce that style of metalwork in jewelry, and silver and gold earrings, necklaces, belt and shoe buckles became popular. As more European settlers arrived, the jewelry “shops” of the day became more diverse, offering a cornucopia of gems and one-of-a-kind pieces made and found throughout the colonies, Europe and South America.

Where It Can Be Seen Today

While many colonial era jewelry pieces have been lost to age, war and attrition, there are several museums with impressive collections. The Metropolitan Museum of Art has a 19th century American jewelry exhibit. Colonial Williamsburg’s DeWitt Wallace Collections and Conservation Building houses a small but precious sampling of 18th and 19th century jewelry. Visit Colonial Williamsburg online – their website has an online clothing …

Helpful Tips on Business Gift Giving Etiquette in Latin America

Being prepared for an international business meeting requires information and knowledge of what will be discussed or presented at this meeting. A nice social gesture when meeting an international company for the first time, usually, is giving a gift. Take the time to research local customs before making a purchase, though, as some countries find it insulting to receive a gift. Knowing what to do before you go will not only show that you cared enough to learn about your destination's etiquette, but may also open up all kinds of new doors and opportunities for you and your company.

Many multi-national businesses and their governments have very strict policies when it comes to business associates accepting gifts. Many Asian countries are concerned about corporate corruption and see gift giving as a bribe, so holding off on gift giving until you get to know the company and its policies may be a good idea. You should know that in Malaysia, most businesses require you establish a working relationship with them before giving a gift. Even here in the United States, our government sets a $ 25 spending limit on how much a business gift can cost.

An important fact to know about Latin American culture is that it is predominantly patriarchal, and very rigid divisions between work and home exist. Men are in business, and women are at home. If you happen to be visiting Guatemala, El Salvador, Colombia, Chile, Nicaragua, or Peru make sure you familiarize yourself with the current affairs and political dealings that are going on within those countries and avoid any discussions about these subjects for it most certainly will destroy any business dealings you hope establish with any companies therein.

When first meeting prospective business clients, handshakes are important so be firm but brief, and always make sure you keep constant eye contact throughout the handshake. When shaking hands with a woman, remember to be courteous and allow her to extend her hand first. Expect the person you're speaking with to stand close to you and look you in the eyes, don't move back or break eye contact because you could offend the person talking to you.

Below are some social taboos you should be aware of since using any of the following gestures can cause problems.

1. The "OK" sign made with your forefinger and thumb is an offensive gesture in Brazil.

2. Placing your hands on your hips in Argentina means you're signaling a challenge.

3. Raising your fist to your head in Chile is a sign of Communism.

Latin America enjoys the business lunch and they are usually pretty long, at least two hours or longer. Dinners are considered purely social events and start late at night, usually around 10:00 or 11:00 pm. When at a social dinner, remember to keep your hands above the table at all times when eating and always pass food with your right hand

Source Article